Top 4 Reasons Your Child Should be a Girl Scout
And it has nothing to do with cookies....
Words Corey Tate, Photography Courtesy of Girl Scouts of Northeast Texas
Published August 2019
Updated September 12, 2019
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Jenn Hulett is no stranger to the balance between a successful career and motherhood. As the Vice President of People for Ericsson North America, she is responsible for all strategic HR direction in support of 10,000 employees. However, her biggest role yet is being a mother and role model to her young daughter and providing her with every opportunity to become a leader and woman of confidence.

During the Girl Scouts Women of Distinction Luncheon in 2015, Jenn felt inspired to dive in as an advocate and she knew this was the organization that she could trust to teach her daughter life-long, valuable lessons. She realized who she wanted her daughter to become—a poised woman of confidence and a self-assured, fierce leader.

After learning more about everything Girl Scouts has to offer and getting her own daughter involved, Jenn wants every parent to know what this organization provides—and it’s so much more than cookies, crafts and camp.

Builds a meaningful relationship

Girl Scouts gave Jenn and her daughter something they can share between the two of them and provided the environment to build a stronger mother-daughter relationship. They are able to learn, experience new activities and create memories together that are unique to Girl Scouts. It also introduced her daughter to a community of girls who are all curious, want to learn about the world and build friendships that will last a lifetime.

Introduces real-world problems and situations

We’ve all encountered the confidence of these girls when they walk up and offer us a box of Thin Mints (and how can we say no? They even take cards.) But first year cookie sellers might not start out that way. It takes a lot of courage and practice to break out of your shell and speak to others or overcome fear of rejection, a situation many adults can’t even overcome. Jenn has watched her daughter grow from shy to ambitious and confident in just two years with her troop.

Volunteering is also a huge part of being a Girl Scout, and for good reason. Whether it’s creating meaningful gifts for the elderly care home or making sandwiches for the homeless, volunteering opens her eyes to the world and encourages her curiosity.

Inspires her to be anything

Girl Scouts addresses the STEM gap straight on by encouraging the girls to engage in STEM related activities from the start through thoughtfully designed programs. She’ll learn to think like an engineer through hands-on design challenges, think like a computer programmer by participating in computational-thinking activities and think like a citizen scientist through collecting data and completing a citizen science project. Jenn elaborated on what makes this aspect of Girl Scouts so important to her:

“Girl Scouts today is moving at the speed of our girls. The programming and activities are designed to help girls develop skills they’ll carry through life – whatever they choose. Many of the jobs of the future will be in a STEM related field—and Girl Scouts is lighting a fire for girls to pursue a career in STEM and inspire them to become leaders in the field.”
Jenn Hulett

Provides her with life-long skills and invests in her future

The skills girls develop in Girl Scouts goes beyond just learning how to work with a team or expand your comfort zone. It provides each girl with an entire community that will always rally behind her, build her up and encourage her to become a well-rounded and ambitious young woman.

As the Vice President and head of the North American HR department, Jenn knows what companies are looking for in female leaders, and she sees how Girl Scouts is helping grow those skills in her daughter. These are the experiences that will have the biggest impact on her and will even translate into her career. That is why Girl Scouts will always make the cut.

Promoted content provided by Girl Scouts of Northeast Texas.